{Online Preview} Issue No. 18

by Anh-Minh on January 23, 2015

Anthology Issue 18 Cover
After our big announcement a few weeks ago, I have a feeling that every new release this year will be bittersweet. We’re just wrapping up the subscription mailing for Issue No. 18/Winter 2015, which is all about color, so it will be arriving soon in mailboxes. (Please note that delivery times vary by location.) Most stores should be receiving their shipments by the end of the month.

In the meantime, we hope you enjoy the online preview that we’ve put together. It highlights just a sampling of the stories in Issue No. 18—there’s plenty more to see in the full print version!

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Weak End Club Ceramics

by Joanna on January 22, 2015

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I consider myself a sucker for two things: great styling and gorgeous ceramics. Weak End Club encompasses both.

The Sydney-based studio is comprised of cross-disciplinary designers who are currently focused on functional ceramic pieces. The works range from planters to bud vases, bowls to dishes, even coin trays. The glazes are quite lovely and range from borrowed-from-the-’70s earth tones to Scandi whites and blues. Simply put: I’m in love.

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{ Images via Weak End Club; found on Trendland }

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Huntz Liu

by Joanna on January 21, 2015

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Cut paper is one of those art forms that requires precision and patience. Those traits alone are impressive! But I was especially drawn to these because of the wonderful hues that the artist employs.

Huntz Liu creates multi-faceted, layered worlds of colorful paper—you almost can get lost in them. He is always adding more work, so be sure to follow him on Instagram to view (and marvel at) his latest pieces.

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 { Images via Huntz Liu; found on The Jealous Curator }

 

 

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Meg Callahan

by Joanna on January 20, 2015

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For as long as I can remember, quilts were my favorite layer to add to my bed. Even as a kid, I would pile on the quilts just for the weight and coziness. And don’t even get me started about how to craft the perfect fort! When I discovered these truly gorgeous quilts by Meg Callahan, I had that sharp-intake-of-breath moment—they are actually pieces of art.

Callahan specializes in patchwork quilting and centers her studio on “creating objects that focus on the beauty of construction.” As I look forward to moving to a new apartment, I can’t help but set my eyes on one of her mad-to-order quilts—the perfectly cozy finishing touch for a new home.

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Aromatic Poached Salmon

by Anh-Minh on January 16, 2015

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I spent the holidays eating foods that sure tasted good, but weren’t exactly good for me. (I can’t resist hush puppies and honey butter!) In the aftermath, I’m happy to add more healthy recipes to my repertoire, like the one Melina Hammer is sharing with us today. —Anh-Minh

Here we are again at the beginning of a new year. For many of us (myself included, this time around) we hope to use this fresh start as a way to refine ourselves and get “back on track” bodily and/or spiritually. This task is especially hard for me, who, as a food photographer, wants nothing more than to indulge the delights of my audience, and share whatever makes us all drool. But I’d like to do that while still maintaining some semblance of personal fitness. (Is it even possible??)

This recipe is about elemental eating. It is about pure flavors: simple things made rich by their intrinsic qualities and the flavorful liquid in which they are gently cooked. And the accent of a terrific aioli, which couldn’t be easier to make. Use the freshest ingredients possible, as their quality will be highlighted in this meal.

Having read this column over the months, and if you’ve ever made any of my recipes—the meat pies, the apple flognarde, the panzanella, or any of the rest of them—you know that I’m very much about good eating. So if the images delight you, know that it is for real. Pull up a chair, cut some veggies, and get set to make this warming, soothing, and yes, superb meal.

Aromatic Poached Salmon

Serves 4

for poaching

  • 4 6-oz pieces of the freshest wild salmon you can find (I used sustainably caught King Salmon; Sockeye, Coho, or Keta Salmon are good choices as well)
  • 3-5 Red Bliss potatoes, scrubbed and cut into wedges
  • 4-6 small carrots, scrubbed and halved or quartered
  • 2 shallots, peeled and cut in half
  • 1 leek, white part only, end trimmed, cut into quarters lengthwise and rinsed of any sand (I used wild leeks which are thinner, and so used 5-7 in this preparation)
  • 4 small cipollini onions, peeled
  • 2-3 fresh bay leaves
  • rind and juice from 1 lemon
  • rind and juice from 1 orange
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1 tsp peppercorns
  • 2 cups dry white wine
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 cups vegetable stock

for the aioli

  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 clove garlic, finely grated
  • a pinch of kosher salt
  • juice from 1/2 lemon
  • 1 tbsp salt-packed capers, soaked, rinsed, and chopped
  • good olive oil

Note: Use a pot only large enough to hold the poaching ingredients so that you do not end up with an enormous volume of leftover poaching liquid. That said, the flavorful liquid can be repurposed for soups, and in which to cook beans or rice, etc. (bonus!). Feel free to scale back—or up—the liquids if they do not cover the salmon.

Make the aioli first. Rest a small mixing bowl on tea towel draped over a pot of similar size. This helps the bowl stay put while you use both hands. Whisk together the egg yolk, salt, and garlic. Squeeze in some of the lemon juice and whisk again. In the thinnest stream, drizzle olive oil as you whisk continuously. It will be about 1/4 cup or so that you’ll add. Stop drizzling at intervals to make sure the mixture has emulsified. Keep whisking to emulsify. It should thicken; when ready, the aioli should appear plump. Add chopped capers and whisk again to combine. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to use.

Into the poaching pot, add the stock, wine, water, citrus rinds and juice, bay leaves, pepper flakes, salt, and peppercorns. Bring the mixture to a gentle simmer. Add the potato wedges and shallots, and cook for 3 minutes or so. Add the carrots, leek, and cipollini next. If you were able to find wild leeks, then don’t add them until you add the salmon. They are more delicate and don’t need much time in the hot bath. Allow all to gently simmer for 3 more minutes. Gently add the salmon to the lot, nestling them amidst the other ingredients so that the liquid just covers the fish. Cover and cook for 5-7 minutes. Err on less time in the pot, as you want the salmon to retain its juiciness—medium at most.

To serve, arrange a couple of each the potatoes, shallots, carrots, leeks, and cipollini into wide shallow bowls. Nest the bright, juicy salmon on top and add a spoonful or two of the liquid, along with some freshly cracked pepper. Then, add as much or as little of the aioli as you like. I hungrily dabbed each vegetable and bite of fish into it.

If there are any leftovers, all will keep for one week. Poaching liquid can be frozen; do so in an ice cube tray so you can pull from it only as needed.

Let this New Year be filled with delicious foods which deeply nourish us. Bon Appetit!

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{ Images by Melina Hammer for Anthology Magazine }

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