Coco Carpets

by Joanna on November 26, 2014

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Anyone who’s ever shopped for a rug knows one thing: it is quite the challenge to find The One. You know, the one that goes with everything you’ve already got, but still brings a level of newness and excitement to the room. Enter Coco Carpets, the latest and greatest from Caroline and Jayden Lee, otherwise known as Woodnote Photography (oh, and Elephant Landing).

Coco Carpets specializes in one-of-a-kind, vintage berber carpets, including boucherouite rugs. Berber carpets refer to rugs made by the women of the Berber tribe located in the Atlas Mountains of Morocco. Traditionally, rugs like this were made of wool and cotton and used in the maker’s own home. Each is about 20-30 years old and a totally perfect addition to any home (read: my home).

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{ Images via Coco Carpets }

 

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Kerri Rosenthal

by Joanna on November 25, 2014

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Talk about impactful. These paintings by Kerri Rosenthal are just plain gorgeous. Rosenthal’s background is in fashion and communications, which I think lends an interesting slant to her work. These pieces rely so strongly on the movement and the colors that it’s all you really need. According to Rosenthal’s site, her works “are inspired by her amplified interpretation of the colors she experiences on her daily travels passing through the vistas of the Saugatuck Valley as well as the beach areas of Long Island Sound.” With such a strong color palette, it’s tough to pick a favorite, isn’t it?

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{ Images via Kerri Rosenthal }

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LaLouL

by Joanna on November 24, 2014

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Launched in 2013, LaLouL is the interior design label of Corinne van Havre. Based in Antwerp, LaLouL is inspired by a variety of influences such as architecture, fashion, craft production, and “noble materials” like metal and glass. While LaLouL is focused on objects and lighting, van Havre is also a jewelry designer and it shows in her works. Each mobile and mirror feels like adornment for the wall, especially with the draping and oversized elements. Each piece is handcrafted by European artisans and totally unique.

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 { Images via LaLouL }

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In her line of work, Los Angeles-based photographer Amy Dickerson meets plenty of interesting people. She shares her images and interviews with some of them in an ongoing series for Anthology called “One on One.”

Christiaan Rollich, Bartender Extraordinaire

Christiaan Rollich
Head Barman, A.O.C. and Lucques restaurants

Christiaan and I met when I was photographing Nancy Pelosi and Julia Louis-Dreyfus for The New York Times, and A.O.C.—one of my favorite L.A. restaurants—was our location. Christiaan is the head barman at A.O.C. and Lucques; he creates some of the finest cocktails in the city. I always look forward to dinner and drinks at A.O.C., and appreciate that they make their own bitters, orange liqueurs, gin, syrups, tinctures, and marmalade. They also work with local farmers to get the freshest ingredients.

Shortly after our initial meeting, I ran into him and his wife at a party (L.A. can be big and small like that). We chatted about music, their young son, cocktails, and the fact that he’s originally from the Netherlands. I love talking spirits and his knowledge of liqueur and its history is incredible. He also comes up with fun and thoughtful names for some of his original cocktail creations—including The Engineer, which is a nod to his homeland. (He was kind enough to share the recipe with us!) “The name is derived from the American Society of Civil Engineers who voted the Delta Works [construction projects] one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World,” Christaan explains. “Since Bols Genever is from the Netherlands, I thought it would be an appropriate name for a cocktail [made with the spirit].”

If you live in L.A. or are planning a trip there, cozy up to the bar at A.O.C., tell Christiaan your favorite spirit, and let him create a cocktail just for you.

Christiaan Rollich, head barman at A.O.C.

Was there a pivotal moment that really impacted your career?

When you grow up, your parents always say go to college, finish school, and so on. My first job was working in a small tavern in the village where I grew up. I paid my way through college by working in restaurants, bars, and night clubs. In other words, making drinks had always had a mystique for me. But I really started to look at it from a different perspective seven years ago—at the first bar meeting at Lucques. They asked me to come up with a cocktail to complement the menu. Their walk-in refrigerator with fresh fruits, vegetables, and herbs is so big—it’s about 9 by 20 feet—and that inspired me. I wanted to do a cucumber drink—cucumber and vodka—and someone else recommended grapefruit. And there it was. And everybody liked it. (I thought I had reinvented the wheel—the best cocktail in the world—only to discover there were many barmen before me who knew cucumber and grapefruit work well together.)

Christiaan Rollich, head barman at A.O.C.

What does your favorite day look like?

Hanging out with my family, my toes in the sand, Heineken in my right hand, looking at my son build sand castles. And my wife enjoying life. As for work, I love Saturdays. I go the farmers’ market in the morning. I browse around to see what everybody has—who has the freshest produce. I make my rounds at Lucques, for A.O.C., for Tavern [another restaurant in The Lucques Group]. I like to look at the bars while nobody is there. How do the glasses look? How do the bottles look? How does the produce look? After checking it all out, I make my way to Lucques, where I start trying out and making new syrups.

Christiaan Rollich, head barman at A.O.C.

What do you love doing that you aren’t doing?

Writing. I’d like to write more.

Words to live by?

The truth. So you can always look people in the eye. Or I like “Je Maintiendrai” as well—which translates to “I will maintain” and its the motto of the Netherlands.

Christiaan Rollich, head barman at A.O.C.

What have you accomplished that you are most proud of so far?

There was a period in my life when I wasn’t sure where to go or what to do. Waking up was an accomplishment. Then slowly but surely, step by step, things went in the right direction, faster and faster. I met my wife, started working at Lucques, finished college while working a job and a half … My wife and my son. I am very proud of my family.

What has been your favorite age so far?

My 20s was fun—seeing the world, exploring it. Traveling with the carnival, working in night clubs, moving to Los Angeles. Making all the mistakes you should make so you won’t have to do it in your 40s. Looking back, that was an exciting time.

I graduated from Athenaeum in Haarlem, a city about 20 minutes by train from Amsterdam. Most kids who finished this level of education, including myself, continued on to go to University. I threw my dice and picked Econometrics, but after six months I decided that University life was not for me. I came across an ad in the newspaper: “Clean young man, wanted to travel with the Carnival.” I replied and had my interview the very next day, in a gypsy camp right next door to the shooting range on the ouskirts of Amsterdam. We traveled from city to city and village to village, north to south and west to east. Working on the miniature casino I saw and learned how to deal with all levels of society. I saw my first street fight, my first knife fight, drove a car that started with a screwdriver.

The night club I later worked at was club IT in the center of Amsterdam. I was a glass boy. It was a crazy environment, à la Studio 54, where everything went. [The patrons were] skaters, lawyers, punks, students, gay, straight, bi. It was there that I made my first appearance behind a legitimate bar.

Christiaan Rollich, head barman at A.O.C.

What is your strongest sense?

I should say my eyes—I can see 20/15, pilot’s vision. I have a bionic implant in the left eye and laser done on the right. But as for senses I use for making cocktails, my sense of smell, I think.

Favorite place to take an out of town guests?

Mi casa. Wine and bread on the table. Kids running through the house. You know I work five nights a week. On my night off, I don’t want to [go out and] spend time looking at how other people do their bar programs. Because that’s how it works: Work never shuts off; there is always something. “Oh they carry this, oh they carry that, oh they do that better than I do, oh I do this better, oh I should change …” Well, you catch my drift. But I do love sitting at Lucques. It is always so special. You never realize how special it is until you sit on the other side of the bar.

Christiaan Rollich, head barman at A.O.C.

The Engineer

This is one of Christaan’s signature cocktails at A.O.C.

  • 1 1/2 oz Bols Genever
  • 1/2 oz Averna
  • 1 oz Gaviota strawberry liqueur (Combine 3 cups quartered Gaviota strawberries, 1 cup vodka, 1 cup brandy. Let it sit for a week. Blend in a Vitamix and then strain through a chinois. Warm it up with sugar, a 1:1 ratio. Add 1/8 tsp orange blossom water and you are ready to go.)
  • 1 oz lemon juice
  • peel of 1 lemon for garnish

Place ingredients in a shaker. Shake and strain over fresh ice into double old-fashioned glasses. Garnish with lemon peel.

Christiaan Rollich, head barman at A.O.C.

{ All images by Amy Dickerson }

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Gallery MAR Bridgette Meinhold

Those of you who have been reading Anthology since the beginning may remember that Bridgette Meinhold appeared in Issue No. 1/Fall 2010. In the course of writing the travel story on Park City, I really wanted to team up with a local—someone who could show me around and share her favorite spots. I was lucky enough to connect with Bridgette, a writer and an artist. Whenever I’m in Park City, I still visit some of those establishments that she introduced me to. (Be sure to check out Bridgette’s current list of must-visits at the bottom of this post!)

Earlier this year, while I was out there for a family vacation, I was thrilled to see her encaustic paintings at Gallery MAR, which has become one of my favorite places in town. Bridgette has a new exhibition opening next Friday, November 28, at Gallery MAR. It’s a joint show with Joe Norman, entitled Bountiful World, and like the rest of her body of work, it is deeply rooted in nature. “I spend a lot of time outdoors—hiking, skiing, climbing, biking, watching clouds—and the main point of my work is to connect others with the outdoor world, even if they can’t live in the woods, like I do,” explains Bridgette. “I feel so incredibly thankful for nature, the mountains, the trees, and their amazing, calming effect on me. If I’m having a difficult day, a long hike makes it better. If I’m having a great day, being outside is the cherry on top. So the inspiration for the show really comes from my gratitude of the natural world and all the gifts it offers up unconditionally.”

Anthology Gallery MAR Bridgette Meinhold

Bridgette’s paintings entail a series of wax layers that, together, create stunning landscapes: weather, atmosphere, mountains, and trees. All of her pieces are done on a hard wood surface, and the frames are built by her husband using reclaimed wood. I am such a fan, and was curious about her process. Here’s what she told me:

I start by painting on a base layer of wax, which is liquid at 200 degrees. As the wax cools, it hardens, and I scrape it flat and fuse it with a torch for a smooth finish. Then I rub in pigment to add color for the sky and paint on my first landscape layer with milk paint, which is an old-fashioned casein-based paint that acts like a thick-bodied watercolor. When that is dry, I paint on another layer of wax, and the process starts over again. I keep adding layers until I’ve created my entire scene. This can be anywhere from three to six layers, depending on what I’m trying to achieve. As a viewer, you can easily count these layers and see how the wax can act the part of the atmosphere that it builds up.

Anthology Gallery MAR Meinhold Process

CITY CONFIDENTIAL

“Park City has so much to offer,” says Bridgette. “Obviously, if you’re into the outdoors, there’s fun activities all year round. Now that it’s winter, it’s time for skiing, snowboarding, snow-shoeing, cross-country skiing, and snow biking. But if you’re not especially outdoorsy, there’s still a ton of great activities.” These are some of her recommendations:

  1. Hit up Atticus Coffee and Teahouse for your morning dose. It also doubles as a great book store.
  2. The Kimball Art Center is our local art museum, offering world-class exhibits and really wonderful workshops and art classes—even short ones for those visiting from out of town.
  3. High West Distillery makes its own vodka on-site in historic and reclaimed buildings. They make a really well-known rye whiskey, too, and serve up small plates.
  4. I’m also a big fan of Shabu, which does amazing Asian fusion food.
  5. For shopping, I like Olive & Tweed as well as Exchange Consignment.
  6. And if you’re looking for something else to do, go on an art tour with Soltesz Fine Art to get the insider info on the best of Park City’s art scene.

Anthology Park City UT

Anthology Gallery MAR Storefront

This post is sponsored by Gallery MAR, one of my must-visits whenever I’m in Park City. Whether you’re a local or a visitor, be sure to check it out if you haven’t already. Bridgette Meinhold and Joe Norman’s joint show, Bountiful World, opens next Friday, November 28. To purchase pieces, please contact Gallery MAR.

{ Studio, process, and portrait images by Claire Wiley; trolley image from Anthology;
all other images courtesy of Gallery MAR }

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