sweets

Donut Time

by Kate on April 10, 2015

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{ Warning: this is a propaganda piece about donuts. }

I can’t speak for my fellow editors, but for me there’s no better vehicle for decadent culinary pleasure than the donut. Donut versus cupcake? Donut. Donut versus pie? Donut. Ice cream? Waffles? Cake? Nachos? I choose donut, every time. Round, glossy, golden, puffy, colorful, textural … What’s not to love?

It only recently occurred to me that I could make my own donuts at home, and luckily there are so many great recipes online. The challenge is simply choosing which one. I’ve provided a variety of types here, as I know donut preferences may vary: cake or fluffy, baked or fried, creme-filled or sugared or glazed … You get the idea. There’s really no wrong option here, so pick one of these amazing recipes and make some donuts today.

{ Image above: ForYourArt’s 24-hour doughnut event at LACMA in 2012. Photo by David Gilbert }

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 { Peanut Butter and Jelly Donuts, via Broma Bakery }

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 { Pistachio Baked Almond Donuts, via Gather & Dine }

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 { Chocolate Hazelnut Long Johns, via O & O Eats }

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 { Pink Strawberry Mini Donuts by Lexy Ward, via Proper }

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 { 15-Minute Donuts from Scratch, via Cooking Classy }

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 { Banana Chocolate Chip Baked Donuts with Caramel Pecan Glaze, via Twigg Studios }

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 { Strawberry Glazed Brown Butter/Buttermilk Doughnuts, via The Kitchy Kitchen }

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 { Passion Fruit Malasadas, via Use Real Butter }

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 { Baked Donuts, via Design Love Fest }

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 { Could donuts look more joyous than this? I doubt it.  Photo by David Paul Schmit }

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Foreign Japanese Sweets

by Kate on March 12, 2015

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There’s no end to the satisfaction I get from seeing things neatly organized, and I’m hardly alone (which is probably why the famous tumblr devoted to this very thing is still going strong after five years). Presenting objects in a clean, graphic layout abstracts them, bringing their color and shape and texture into focus in a wholly surprising and delightful way. Foreign Japanese Sweets, a cookbook created by designer Moé Takamura that provides classic Japanese dessert recipes using ingredients found in Western countries, illustrates yet another reason why this form of styling is so wonderful: It’s remarkably helpful!

His bird’s-eye view of the mixing bowl, measuring cup, or sauce pot at each step is both visually enticing and highly informative. As a result, Japanese Foreign Sweets transcends your standard cookbook: It is artwork, recipes, and even a language lesson all bound into one. And that cover? Scrumptious in every way. You can pick up a copy here.

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Recipe Roundup: Lovely Lemon

by Kate on March 6, 2015

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Last month, several members of the Anthology team met up in North Berkeley to produce a photo shoot for our spring issue. As we were wrapping up,  I spotted a mysteriously large, lumpy brown paper bag sitting on the couch. It turns out that Nancy, the magazine’s editorial assistant, had generously brought the bounty of her Meyer lemon tree to share with us! Major score, as these were no ordinary petite, delicate lemons— these were hefty, bulbous, golden specimens. We instantly dove for the bag and piled them into our arms with glee.

To make good use of my lemony loot, I went searching for some incredible recipes and was not disappointed. Today I’m sharing some of the recipes that I tried (I made the cake above for a gathering and it received rave reviews!) and a few others that I still want to try. If you have access to lemons—which is likely this time of year—I urge you to grab an armful, bring them home, and make one of these yummy items at once. Thank you for the inspiration, Nancy!

{ Image above: Blueberry, Lemon and Almond Cake via Helena la Petite }

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 { Lemon & Yogurt Pancakes via Mighala Doce}

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 { Gluten-free Lemon Olive Oil Cake via Cup 4 Cup }

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{ Lemon and Blueberry Waffles via Minimalist Baker }

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{ Lemon and Creme Fraiche Cake with Limoncello Glaze via Butter and Brioche }

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{ Lemon and Coconut Cream Pie via Hummingbird High }

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Banana-Salted Caramel Pie

by Anh-Minh on October 31, 2014

bananasIf miniature chocolate bars aren’t your thing—okay, even if they are your thing—we’ve got a sweet treat that’s perfect for this Halloween weekend. Today, Melina Hammer is sharing a recipe that is sure to make your mouth water.

Banana-Salted Caramel Pie

When I first made this pie, I thought it would be quite tasty. I never dreamed I’d be willing to fight my husband off for the last slice. This pie is that good. Everyone with whom I share it utters layers of profundities as the flavor and texture hit them.

Best thing? Huge payoff without that much effort. You’ll get a good arm workout in crushing those pretzels and biscuits for the crust, but that makes the indulgence of pie even sweeter.

And about that crust … It’s a delightful sweet-salty combo incorporating hard pretzels and after dinner cookie-biscuits. Choose good quality ingredients and the pie will shine even more: I swear by Martin’s Pretzels, a Pennsylvania dutch-style, which I scored at the NYC Greenmarket. Since having relocated to the south I was concerned I would have to find an alternative, but thanks to the internet, they ship right to your door!

This pressed crust is similar to the one I made for the muscadine marbled cheesecake story last year. The more finely you grind the two, the more readily it will hold together. In this version, I prefer the toothiness of smaller and larger bits together and don’t mind if it falls apart a little. It makes for a beautiful mess! If you choose this route, remember you can always use a spoon to serve it, so the messiness becomes part of the design, rather than a flaw. :)

Lastly, the addition of crème fraîche into the whipping cream helps cuts the sweetness of the caramel and banana slices, in a pretty amazing way. It also helps the cream hold those stiff peaks, which is a nice bonus.

See if you don’t go crazy for this pie too. I dare you to find out.

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CRUST

  • 2 cups cookie biscuits, coarsely broken
  • 1 3/4 cup salted pretzels, coarsely broken (I used chunky, handmade pretzels from Martin’s—crisp, airy, salty, simple)
  • 1/2 cup pastured butter, melted
  • 1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg

SALTED CARAMEL

  • 1 cup caster sugar
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 6 tbsp butter, cubed
  • 1 tsp sea salt flakes

TOPPING

  • 1 cup crème fraîche
  • 2/3 cup heavy cream
  • 1 vanilla bean
  • 4-5 ripe bananas, sliced on a bias**
  • shaved dark chocolate for topping
**Do this at the very end so that the bananas do not brown

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1. Place biscuits and pretzels in a sealable plastic bag and rock a rolling pin back and forth and side-to-side, turning them into crumbs. Empty crumbs into a large bowl, add grated nutmeg and melted butter, and mix until combined.

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2. Transfer mixture into a 9 1/2-inch pie pan and press into the base and up the sides, spreading and compacting the crust evenly. Refrigerate for at least 20 minutes.

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3. To make the caramel, stir sugar and 1/4 cup water in a saucepan over medium heat until the sugar dissolves. Bring to a boil, cooking the sugar until it turns caramel in color, about 10 minutes. Add butter, cream, and the sea salt and be careful, as the hot caramel may spit. Stir until well incorporated. Pour into the chilled pie crust. Refrigerate again.

4. Halve vanilla bean lengthwise and scrape seeds into a bowl, adding in the cream and crème fraîche. With an electric mixer, whip creams and vanilla seeds until sturdy peaks form. Chill in refrigerator while slicing bananas. Arrange sliced bananas in a pattern which pleases you, covering the caramel surface completely, and set aside.

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5. Spoon cream onto bananas, swirl topping to cover, and sprinkle with shaved chocolate. Keeps for one week refrigerated in a sealed container. If it lasts that long …

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{ Text, Recipes & Photographs by Melina Hammer for Anthology Magazine }

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anthology-mag-blog-artisan-chocolate-bars-from-unelefante-3Here at Anthology we are nothing if not a group of food enthusiasts and lovers of good packaging. For these reasons alone, we are currently obsessed with this collaboration between Mexico-based boutique Unelefante and chocolatier Jorge Llanderal. Our favorite might be the Pollock bar shown above, which is inspired by the famed American painter and was the collection’s first release. It features 54% cocoa and is hand-painted with bright, bold splashes of color.

Each of the chocolate bars is unique, making them a great gift that doesn’t even require any wrapping!

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{ Images from Unelefante via Knstrct }

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