recipes

Donut Time

by Kate on April 10, 2015

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{ Warning: this is a propaganda piece about donuts. }

I can’t speak for my fellow editors, but for me there’s no better vehicle for decadent culinary pleasure than the donut. Donut versus cupcake? Donut. Donut versus pie? Donut. Ice cream? Waffles? Cake? Nachos? I choose donut, every time. Round, glossy, golden, puffy, colorful, textural … What’s not to love?

It only recently occurred to me that I could make my own donuts at home, and luckily there are so many great recipes online. The challenge is simply choosing which one. I’ve provided a variety of types here, as I know donut preferences may vary: cake or fluffy, baked or fried, creme-filled or sugared or glazed … You get the idea. There’s really no wrong option here, so pick one of these amazing recipes and make some donuts today.

{ Image above: ForYourArt’s 24-hour doughnut event at LACMA in 2012. Photo by David Gilbert }

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 { Peanut Butter and Jelly Donuts, via Broma Bakery }

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 { Pistachio Baked Almond Donuts, via Gather & Dine }

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 { Chocolate Hazelnut Long Johns, via O & O Eats }

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 { Pink Strawberry Mini Donuts by Lexy Ward, via Proper }

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 { 15-Minute Donuts from Scratch, via Cooking Classy }

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 { Banana Chocolate Chip Baked Donuts with Caramel Pecan Glaze, via Twigg Studios }

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 { Strawberry Glazed Brown Butter/Buttermilk Doughnuts, via The Kitchy Kitchen }

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 { Passion Fruit Malasadas, via Use Real Butter }

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 { Baked Donuts, via Design Love Fest }

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 { Could donuts look more joyous than this? I doubt it.  Photo by David Paul Schmit }

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Recipe Roundup: Breakfast Grains

by Kate on March 27, 2015

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For many years I powered through the first eight hours of my day on nothing but coffee and meager snacks, and was always wondering why I felt achey, tired, cranky. I’ve only recently wised up, and now that I respect the role that breakfast plays in my daily life, I’ve been having a lot of fun experimenting with all the healthy options out there. Yet I have a confession to make—which is that when it comes to world of grains, I am a completely uninformed newbie. There’s more to it than cornflakes and Cheerios?

As my ignorance about whole grains is starting to lift, I want to celebrate with a roundup of amazing grain-based breakfast recipes. Oatmeal is of course delicious, but I never realized how many ways you can make granola: It is a culinary universe unto itself. And porridge? Millet? Spelt and amaranth and quinoa? So many options, and all remarkably easy to throw together with nut milks, spices, fruits, and nuts to make a nourishing, delectable morning meal. Breakfast, you’re blowing my mind.

{ Image above: Roasted Fig & Honey Millett Porridge via Fig & Honey }

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 { Superfood Granola with Homemade Almond-Macadamia Nut Milk via Dolly & Oatmeal }

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 { Coconut Cardamom Granola & Creamy Vanilla Pumpkin Seed Milk via Happy Hearted Kitchen }

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 { Three Grain Blend & Breakfast Porridge via Edible Perspective }

anthologymag-blog-recipe-roundup-breakfastgrains-5{ Seriously Super Cereal via My New Roots }

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All Natural Skin Recipes

by Kate on March 24, 2015

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After numerous discussions with my fellow Anthology editors about spas over the years, I can safely say we’re all on board for a little self TLC from time to time. I was very excited to stumble upon this collection of skincare recipes on the site of Austin-based design and event-planning firm Camille Styles—a treasure trove of beautiful tidbits. At first glance these look like the makings for delicious snacks, but they are actually a series of homemade treatments for cleansing, toning, and hydrating your skin. They were created by Adina Grigore, author of Skin Cleanse and the creator S.W. Basics,  who believes that the best ingredients for beautiful skincare are the exact same ones needed to feed a healthy body. 

Adina’s philosophy is one of simplicity, and all the products in her line are comprised of five ingredients or less. What I love about these recipes is that they are cost effective—made up of kitchen staples easily found in grocery stores—but also gentle, chemical-free, and easy to throw together in a few minutes. I know I’ll be taking a quick trip to the market and setting aside a little time tonight for one of these yummy treatments … How about you? 

{ Image above: Calming Aloe Cleanser recipe via Camille Styles; photography by Chaunté Vaughn }

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 { Skin Feast Mask via Camille Styles; photography by Chaunté Vaughn }

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{ Pumpkin Pie Glow Mask via Camille Styles; photography by Chaunté Vaughn }

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Umami Grain Bowl

by Anh-Minh on March 20, 2015

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I admit: Sometimes, when I’ve got deadline after deadline, I don’t eat as well as I should. Thankfully, Melina Hammer is back on the blog today sharing a recipe that will help get me back on track! —Anh-Minh

This recipe is a continuation, in a way, of the elemental eating created for the start of this year (with the Aromatic Poached Salmon recipe). Centering delicious eating around simple foods can be a challenge, but is hugely rewarding, if done well. With spring officially having arrived (what!?), the vibrant foods we’ll all soon have available don’t need much to make them shine. This kind of meal means we can all eat well, with carefully chosen ingredients that make for a special resonance together.

Added to this is my continued play with flavor superstars like anchovies, seaweed, and bottarga. I tackled anchovies a few years ago after vehemently hating them for years. At some undefined point, I realized I probably didn’t know what a good anchovy experience was and so started to explore. I’ve been in love for a good while, and I add anchovies to any foods where an extra punch of flavor seems like a good idea. (um, hello everyday) The secret is in using good quality anchovies, and the right proportions for the other flavors of whatever it is you’re making.

Same with the other umami stars. In an effort to demystify exotic (to me) ingredients, as well as to adapt them to my own cuisine preferences, here’s the scoop: After roasting my own seaweed for another project—so easy to do, it turns out—I’ve wanted to put it on everything. It’s like potato chips from the sea …  So good. And good for you.

Bottarga is my newest foray into “weird food.” Bottarga is the cured egg pouch from mullet (or tuna), and is briny, tangy, and basically delightful. Like caviar but served shaved or grated—more fruit leather than jam, if that makes any sense. In the Mediterranean, bottarga is a traditional food, but it has also gained a widespread gourmet popularity thanks to chefs and foodies.

General rule of thumb with each of these flavor stars: A little goes a long way. You don’t need to be knocked out by these flavors, unless you like that type of thing. But, a little “Mmm … What is that??” as you eat, is a good thing. Taste a tiny bit of each. Get familiar. Then taste as you go, to season appropriate to your own preferences.

This tasty grain bowl can be eaten warm, but the nice thing about it is that it doesn’t have to. Each element can be cooked in advance and allowed to cool to room temperature, or refrigerated and then pulled from later. Which, because you didn’t have to sweat doing it all at once, makes the layers in color, texture, and flavor even better! Perfect for getting out to enjoy this much-anticipated spring.

Umami Grain Bowl

Serves 4

for the bowl

  • 1 cup black rice
  • 2 cups veg or chicken broth (use homemade for better flavor)
  • 2 handfuls broccolini, woody ends of stems trimmed
  • 2 heads radicchio, cut into wedges
  • 1 cluster beech mushrooms, ends trimmed and separated into smaller clusters
  • 2 farm eggs
  • olive oil, for sautéing
  • sea salt and freshly cracked pepper

for the vinaigrette

  • 3-5 anchovies (buy jarred so you can see if they are still pink—a sign of freshness)
  • 7 cloves roasted garlic (sometimes I roast heads of garlic, but this time around I bought a ready-made jar of roasted garlic to simplify)
  • 1-2 tbsp sherry vinegar
  • 1/3 cup good olive oil
  • 1 tbsp dijon mustard
  • 1/4 cup parsley, chopped
  • juice from half a lemon
  • pinch red pepper flakes

to garnish

  • bottarga
  • roasted seaweed, cut into thin strips
  1. Make a paste of the anchovies and roasted garlic in a mortar and pestle. If you don’t have one, use the flat side of a knife to flatten and smear each on a cutting board. Transfer the mixture to a medium bowl. Add the mustard, lemon juice, vinegar, pepper flakes, parsley, and olive oil, and whisk to combine. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. Set aside.
  2. To cook the rice, pour the broth and rice in a saucepan. Heat on high to bring to a boil. Cover, turn heat to low, and simmer for a half hour or until the liquid is absorbed and the rice al dente. Remove from heat.
  3. Meanwhile, bring a small saucepan of water to a boil and then carefully lower in the eggs. At a gentle boil, cook the eggs for 6 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to transfer them to a bowl filled with ice water. When cool enough to handle, peel away their shells. If you’re assembling the bowl later, refrigerate the eggs after the ice bath, and wait to peel the eggs until that time. The cooked eggs will keep 5 days refrigerated.
  4. For the attractive vegetable piles nestled on top of the grain, I prepared each veg in separate sauté pans. You don’t have to for practicality’s sake, but if this presentation appeals to you, do the same.
  5. Over medium heat, sauté the mushrooms until tender and golden, about 5 minutes. A small sprinkle of sea salt and pepper is okay here, but keep in mind the salty-savory flavors you’ll be adding and hold back the usual salt.
  6. Even more briefly, sauté the broccolini in a little olive oil. Add a splash of remaining stock or water, just to soften the membranes a little. As soon as they have become shiny and bright green, remove the pan from the heat.
  7. Over medium-high heat, get the skillet nice and hot and hard sear the radicchio wedges in olive oil. Three minutes a side is a good starting point. Transfer to a serving platter.
  8. Toss the rice and vinaigrette together. Portion out the rice into bowls. Add a cluster of the mushrooms and some broccolini. The natural curve of the broccolini stems makes a perfect home for a half custardy 6-minute egg. Either allow people to add the radicchio to their plates table side (they are dramatic arranged on a plate for everyone to appreciate), or waive ceremony and nestle a couple wedges beside the other veg.
  9. At the table, Use a microplane to grate a little bottarga over the earthy mushrooms and bitter-sweet charred radicchio. Add a cluster of seaweed strips over top, and dig in. The sweetness of the broccolini, the custard egg, the flavorsome rice, and all the other flavors make for a punchy symphony that is incredibly satisfying.

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P.S. If you’re looking for more great springtime recipes, I recently shot the dishes for Mark Bittman’s The New York Times feature on California produce. They’re as delicious as they are beautiful!

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Foreign Japanese Sweets

by Kate on March 12, 2015

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There’s no end to the satisfaction I get from seeing things neatly organized, and I’m hardly alone (which is probably why the famous tumblr devoted to this very thing is still going strong after five years). Presenting objects in a clean, graphic layout abstracts them, bringing their color and shape and texture into focus in a wholly surprising and delightful way. Foreign Japanese Sweets, a cookbook created by designer Moé Takamura that provides classic Japanese dessert recipes using ingredients found in Western countries, illustrates yet another reason why this form of styling is so wonderful: It’s remarkably helpful!

His bird’s-eye view of the mixing bowl, measuring cup, or sauce pot at each step is both visually enticing and highly informative. As a result, Japanese Foreign Sweets transcends your standard cookbook: It is artwork, recipes, and even a language lesson all bound into one. And that cover? Scrumptious in every way. You can pick up a copy here.

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