inspiration

Swans Island

by Joanna on August 21, 2014

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Good textiles are such a luxury and often well worth a higher price, especially when handmade. It’s such a wonderful feeling to curl up with a favorite throw or blanket—and right now, I’m smitten with Swans Island. These textiles are handwoven in Maine using yarns such as organic merino, silk, alpaca, and domestic Corriedale wool, dyed with all-natural dyes. The result? Throws that are incredibly soft, exquisitely made, and reminiscent of a family heirloom.

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{ Images via Swans Island }

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Moving Mountains

by Joanna on August 20, 2014

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Talk about furniture eye candy! Moving Mountains is a Brooklyn-based design studio started by Syrette Lew. Hailing from Hawaii, the name of Lew’s practice is a “tribute to the Hawaiian archipelago and its imperceptible movement northwestward.” While the studio produce bags and jewelry along with a furniture line, it’s the larger scale pieces that have captured my attention. Each piece is hand-crafted and made of materials such as fractured marble, veneered maple, and ash. The aesthetic is actually reminiscent of mountains themselves, in the pure angular geometry you’d expect of a range.

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{ Images via Moving Mountains }

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Katakana NY Ceramics

by Joanna on August 19, 2014

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Katakana NY derives inspiration from a range of concepts. First and foremost, “kata kana” means “shape,” and it is also the Japanese character set for transcribing Western and foreign language. This New York-based design and lifestyle collaboration project was formed in 2012 when Japanese ceramicists Shino Takeda and Romy Northover combined forces. The result are the restrained, yet emotive pieces you see here. The shapes are simple and clean, while the glazes are what make these pieces truly sing.

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Lizzy Stewart

by Joanna on August 13, 2014

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Meet Lizzy Stewart. Illustrator, painter, artist. Stewart’s aesthetic is fresh and lively, while her paintings themselves feel like tiny, intricate worlds unto themselves. Working in a variety of mediums, from watercolor to pencil, she is a true talent. She studied at both the Edinburgh College of Art and Central Saint Martins, and is currently one-half of independent publisher Sing Statistics. Additionally, Stewart’s clientele includes The New York Times, Random House, and The Guardian.

Although I’m bummed that her illustrated guide to Helsinki has sold out, there’s plenty of other lovely items still available in her online shop.

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{ Images via Lizzy Stewart. Found on Design Crush. }

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Ariele Alasko

by Joanna on August 12, 2014

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Based in Brooklyn, woodworker and furniture builder Ariele Alasko is a true talent. Her works fall into that world of being modern, yet rooted in old-school craftsmanship. Ariele’s material of choice is plaster lath, small stripes of wood that once made up the walls of homes. She uses these historic, varied pieces of wood to create graphic, geometric patterns in her work. It’s sort of unbelievable, but she doesn’t actually use any stains on the wood, instead relying on the varieties of grain and color available when old brownstones are gutted. Each piece is made by hand, meaning that it can take up to several weeks to complete a single object. While her shop is currently sold out, be sure to check back in for more pieces and follow her working process (and adventures) on Instagram.

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{ Images via Ariele Alasko and her Instagram }

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