Grapefruit Rhubarb Cocktail

by Kate on September 3, 2015

anthologymag-blog-drink-rhubarb-cocktail-1I’m not usually much of a cocktail drinker, but I make exceptions. Summertime is my favorite season for enjoying cool, refreshing mixed drinks; and I also have a hard time resisting when the drink is slightly sweet, beautiful to look at, and packed with refreshing citrus flavors. This Grapefruit Rhubarb cocktail fits all of my requirements, and I cannot wait to make some of these for friends (and myself!) to enjoy over Labor Day weekend.

The basis of this drink is grapefruit juice mixed with a rhubarb syrup. Izy Hossack, a student of Food Science & Nutrition in London and the creator of the incredible food blog Top With Cinnamon, came up with the recipe. Hosack notes that the combination of the juice and the syrup yields a gorgeous cerise-colored mix that would be equally wonderful without alcohol. She suggests mixing it with a bit of sparkling water as a fizzy refresher, or swirling it liberally onto a bowl of plain frozen yogurt for dessert. I am going to try all of her recommendations, of course—plus a few ideas of my own, too.

anthologymag-blog-drink-rhubarb-cocktail-2anthologymag-blog-drink-rhubarb-cocktail-3anthologymag-blog-drink-rhubarb-cocktail-4anthologymag-blog-drink-rhubarb-cocktail-5{ All images and full recipe from Top With Cinnamon }


Cabrillo Glassware

by Kate on September 2, 2015

anthologymag-blog-products-quitokeeto-cabrillo-glass-1As Market Editor, I’m always on the lookout for good styling inspiration. Recently I was browsing online and when I made my way over to Quitokeeto, I was struck by their impeccable photography. Many of their photographs have this amazing painterly quality, and feel more like still life studies than images of products for sale.

I found myself particularly drawn to these hand-blown, California-made Cabrillo glasses. The patterned surfaces create beautiful refractions of light and color, and they seem like the perfect size and shape for any special drink you want to savor and appreciate in the moment. The glasses are on sale here, and while you’re there be sure to check out the rest of Quitokeetos’ collection of lovingly treated, well-made goods for kitchen and home.

anthologymag-blog-products-quitokeeto-cabrillo-glass-2anthologymag-blog-products-quitokeeto-cabrillo-glass-3anthologymag-blog-products-quitokeeto-cabrillo-glass-4anthologymag-blog-products-quitokeeto-cabrillo-glass-5{ All images via Quitokeeto }


Lemon Meringue Pie

by Anh-Minh on May 1, 2015


I am definitely a dessert person, but I prefer my sweets to be simple, not overly complicated with too many flavors and embellishments. Which is why this pie by Melina Hammer is right up my alley. Plus, I love that it comes with a heartfelt story, one that might just prompt you to whip this up for Mother’s Day. Of course, you could do a test run this this weekend, too! — Anh-Minh

One of my favorite desserts always on rotation is my mother’s lemon meringue pie. I have fond memories of her dabbing and twirling the meringue before sliding the pie into the oven for that golden kiss on its top-most surfaces, the final touch before we kids eagerly devoured it.

This pie is both rich and light. Its textural variety—with the crumb crust bringing it all together—is perfection. As far as desserts go, this feels like a great way to celebrate spring, and makes for a satisfying but not too-heavy end to any meal.

As I’ve encountered lemon meringue pies over the years I realize that her creation resembles a key lime pie more than the customary gelatinous lemon meringue pie—often similar to my mother’s in name only. I have never liked lemon meringue pies made with corn starch, which when used imparts a gelatin-like, bouncy filling.

Her recipe was passed to her from her mother and uses sweetened condensed milk. Its addition produces a filling more like lemon curd, and is fantastic in its custardy richness.

This time around baking the pie, I made a few tweaks. Some which I would repeat, and one that I wouldn’t. I normally use a typical pie tin, and this time around chose a fluted tart pan. It isn’t well-suited to a crumb crust. It worked out, but there were a few profanities uttered once I realized the extra work I made for myself. The other choices were great: I added an additional egg, I baked the crust rather than simply chilling it, and I baked the filling briefly to set it before adding the meringue, which, as it sat out, proved to be quite useful in preserving its shape.

As recipes go, this has stood the test of time and will be a favorite pie I return to forever. I hope you’ll love it too, making this lemon meringue pie delight a steady go-to in your own home.

Lemon Meringue Pie

graham cracker crumb crust

  • 9 full graham crackers – just over 1 ½ cups
  • 3 tbsp organic cane sugar
  • 1/3 cup butter, melted
  • 1 tsp cinnamon

pie filling

  • 1 tbsp lemon zest
  • 2/3 cup lemon juice (about 3 lemons)
  • 1 can sweetened condensed milk (choose organic if possible)
  • 4 free-range eggs, yolks and whites separated, yolks used here*

*Free range yolks have a more richly orange hue due to the variety in the chickens’ natural diet, and the yolks are more muscular, sitting much taller than regular flabby supermarket eggs. These are a better choice for all cooking.


  • 4 egg whites
  • 3 tbsp caster sugar
  • ¼ tsp cream of tartar
  1. Construct a pouch out of parchment paper, folding a sheet in half and then creasing both sides over a couple times to close them. Place the graham crackers inside the opening at the top. Lean your weight onto a rolling pin and rock back and forth, crushing the cookies into crumbs. Move across the pouch up and down, side-to-side. Check for stray larger pieces and repeat the process as needed. I enjoy the rustic quality of this toothier crumb, but if you prefer them more fine, just go over with the rolling pin a bit longer, or nix the pouch and give the crackers a whiz in a food processor.
  2. Empty graham crumbs into a mixing bowl. Add remaining dry ingredients and stir together. Pour melted butter in and mix to combine. Use a rubber spatula or the back of a spoon to spread and press the mixture evenly into the pie tin. Check for evenness, carefully pushing thicker areas thinner, and gently pressing to compact. Press along the sides of the tin to ensure the crust edge is even all around. Chill for at least a half-hour.
  3. Preheat oven to 350°F. Bake crust for 10-15 minutes, until lightly browned. Cool on a wire rack. Combine lemon juice and zest and whisk in condensed milk. Once incorporated, add the egg yolks and whisk to combine.
  4. Pour into room temperature crust and bake 10-15 minutes, until just-set and not browned at all. Cool again on a wire rack. This can be done a day ahead and placed in the refrigerator to chill, and bringing the pie as-is out from the fridge when you are ready to make the meringue. Two tips for meringue: Use a scrupulously clean steel, copper, or glass bowl, and do not attempt to make meringue on a humid day. The moisture in the air will prevent a light and airy meringue from forming.
  5. Add cream of tartar to egg whites. Beat with an electric mixer until just stiff enough to hold a peak. Gradually add sugar a tablespoon at a time and beat in between, until glossy, stiff peaks form.
  6. If you did make the pie a day in advance, preheat the oven to 325°F. Otherwise, lower temperature to 325°F. Scoop the meringue onto the pie filling. With sweeping motions, spread meringue to the edges, all the way to the crust. Use a rubber spatula to make swirling gestures in the meringue, and then bake for about 15 minutes. Start to check after 10 minutes on the doneness of the meringue—you’re looking for brown-kissed peaks, ultimately. Continue to bake if necessary, checking every couple minutes until ready.
  7. Cool on a wire rack, serve, and enjoy. See if you don’t devour every last bit.

lemonpie01 lemonpie02 lemonpie03 crust lemonpie04 lemonpie05 lemonpie07 lemonpie08 lemonpie09

{ Photos and Recipes by Melina Hammer for Anthology Magazine }

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I came across this achingly beautiful entertaining spread while browsing the online wares of Spartan Shop, the impeccably styled and stocked boutique based in Austin, Texas. Entitled Sobremessa, this collaboration between Spartan and NYC-based clothing shop Apiece Apart celebrates that wonderful time after a meal when everyone lingers at the table, perhaps nibbling a few last bites and reveling in the pleasure of good food amidst good company.

Like the colors of a Dutch painting, the velvety greens, peaches and neutrals of these images are so rich and creamy—you can almost taste them. If you are feeing inspired to host a similarly elegant communal gathering, you’re in luck: All of the linens, tableware, and serving pieces are available for purchase through Spartan. Made of durable, timeless materials, these pieces will last you and your family a lifetime of sobremessa moments.



 { Images above: photographed by Currie Person and styled by Sarah Baker, via Apiece Apart }


{ Image above: some of the tableware pieces included in the spread, all available at Spartan Shop }


Anthology-Dahlin-al-frescoI know a lot of people suffer from entertaining fatigue after the holidays, but not me. I love the idea of starting off a new calendar year by getting together with friends—recapping the past year, while also celebrating the beginning of the next one and the opportunities that it presents. So I’ve been taking yet another look at the entertaining story from Issue No. 17/Fall 2014, which featured L.A.-based interior designer Isabelle Dahlin and her chef-husband Brandon Boudet. (It’s even been warm enough lately in the Bay Area for me to consider an alfresco gathering like theirs!)

I recently realized that there are outtakes from our shoot with the couple that haven’t been shared yet, and figured it’s a good time to do just that. Maybe seeing these images will inspire your own gathering. And if you’re interested in the recipes from the article—I’m especially looking forward to making Brandon’s Herbed Cauliflower “Rice”—you can still purchase Issue No. 17 through most of our stockists.

Anthology-Dahlin-blankets Anthology-Dahlin-guests-cast-iron Anthology-Dahlin-collage Anthology-Dahlin-guest-diningroom

I love the glimpses of Isabelle’s indoor and outdoor decor in these photos. If you’re as big a fan of her style as I am, and you’re in the L.A. area, be sure to visit her shop, deKor. (I was happy to see that the swing she installed in her living room is available online!)

{ All images by Amy Dickerson for Anthology Magazine }