Textiles

Cotton & Flax

by Joanna on April 7, 2014

Meet Cotton & Flax, a modern, yet casual line of textiles and fine art prints by designer and maker Erin Dollar. Each of Erin’s pieces is created as a limited edition in her Los Angeles-based studio. She begins her designs by drawing artwork by hand. Once she’s achieved a pattern she likes, she transfers it onto a silkscreen and prints onto fabrics with water-based inks. Erin then sews the linens into pillows, napkins, and coasters. The result is a line of textiles that feels like a modern-day heirloom.

{ Images via Cotton & Flax }

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If you follow Anthology on Instagram, you may have noticed that earlier this week we spent some time at the new Madeline Weinrib showroom in San Francisco. It was a real treat meeting the designer herself and checking out the gorgeous 4,000-square-foot space.

The showroom is in the Design Center, but is open to the public (i.e., not trade-only) and the plan is to have the entire Madeline Weinrib collection available at the outpost. Which is great news for fans like myself, who used to have such a hard time sourcing her products—I still remember lugging my first MW rug back from New York years ago! (My wallet, on the other hand, may consider this bad news.)

Clients can work with the showroom staff (or their own designer) to develop bespoke pieces. The bins on the right are filled with color samples.

How gorgeous is this wall of Weinrib’s ikats?

And this wall of pillows!

A rack of carpets allows visitors to examine the handwoven designs.

I especially love the postcards that represent the myriad rug patterns and colors.

Perhaps your wardrobe could use a bit of Weinrib in it? You’re in luck: Apparel and accessories are also available.

If you’re in San Francisco, I highly recommend a visit to the Madeline Weinrib showroom. (My photography does not do the place justice.) It’s located at 101 Henry Adams, Suite #101. On the ground floor, near the main entrance to the Design Center, it could not be easier to find.

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Founded by creative director and designer Sarah Sherman Samuel, A Sunny Afternoon is an eclectic online boutique with an exquisite range of tabletop textiles. This bright and cheerful collection was “born out of Sarah’s desire to create a line that marries her style with her love of the outdoors, gathering for a meal, and the handmade.” In fact, most of the items in the shop are made in her father’s Michigan workshop, including the heirloom-quality wooden serving boards. We also love Sarah’s cheerful textiles—especially the napkins. Each piece is handmade in the U.S. using a linen/cotton blend fabric and brightly colored prints. These pieces are picnic-perfect, don’t you think?

{ Images via A Sunny Afternoon }

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Ace & Jig for Beautiful Dreamers

by Joanna on February 18, 2014

Hailing from Williamsburg, Beautiful Dreamers is the ultimate retail and art space for the free spirited, bohemian set. Founded by stylists April Hughes and Marina Burini, this boutique is beautifully curated. Recently, they debuted a collaboration with fashion design team Ace & Jig. The line is made from hand-loomed Indian textiles pieced together by Pauline Boyd of Counterpane. Each pillow and quilt features a unique composition of shapes, textiles, and textures in both unexpected and traditional patterns. The total patchwork effect is a look that has touches of heirloom, while also being totally new and very, very cool.

{ Photos from Beautiful Dreamers }

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Mr. Finch Textile Art

by Joanna on January 21, 2014

Comprised of vintage textiles—such as fur, needlepoint, and velvet—self-taught artist Mr. Finch creates his own taxidermy. Most inspired by nature, Mr. Finch is fascinated by insects and “their amazing life cycles and extraordinary nests and behavior.” The incredible detail of these pieces is absolutely astounding, especially considering that each insect and toadstool is made by hand. I especially love the idea of grouping together multiples of these pieces to create a beautiful and unexpected vignette.

{ Images via Mr. Finch }

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