In The Magazine

{Off Shoots} Jill and Jason

by Anh-Minh on August 8, 2014

Anthology-Schulte-readingcornerI’ve been a fan of San Francisco-based creative studio Office for years now, without even knowing it. They’re responsible for lots of  cool design works that I’ve seen around, and just didn’t realize was theirs! (I especially love the posters and t-shirts they created for 826 Valencia.) So it was a real treat to meet the talented couple behind the firm: Jill Robertson and Jason Schulte. We’re featuring their home and family (they have three-year-old twin boys, Max and Leo) in our current issue, No. 16. There were actually several spaces in their gorgeous house that we weren’t able to include in the print magazine, but I knew I wanted to share as an “Off Shoots” post.

Also, can we talk about how cute the wall decals are in the boys’ room (shown below)? And yes, those are designed by Jill and Jason. In addition to running Office, they co-founded Wee Society, which specializes in children’s apps, art, stories, and characters. The decals are available through Art.com. My favorite Wee Society product, though, is probably these personalized alphabet prints. I saw the pair that Jill and Jason had in their home for Max and Leo, and immediately coveted them (with different names, of course).

I hope you enjoy these outtakes, and have a great weekend!

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{ Photos by Thayer Allyson Gowdy for Anthology Magazine }

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Anthology Issue No. 16 Cover

In yesterday’s post, I hinted at the imminent release of Issue No. 16—and, today, I’m pleased to report that the magazine has arrived from the printer. It will soon be making its way into subscribers’ mailboxes and be available through our stockists. In the meantime, we’re sharing an online sneak peek, which includes a sampling of the stories that you’ll find in our family-themed summer release. 

Please note that delivery times do vary by location, so it may take 1-3 weeks for subscription copies to arrive. If you placed your subscription order between April 1-June 30, it starts with Issue No. 16. If you ordered on/after July 1, it starts with Issue No. 17/Fall 2014. 

We hope you enjoy Issue No. 16!

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Anthology-Rossman-portrait-shop-platesAs soon as I read Joanna Rakoff’s article on Joanne Rossman, which is published in Issue No. 15, I wanted to meet her. I’m hoping that the next time I’m in the Boston area, I’ll have the pleasure of doing so, because she sounds amazing. And her Roslindale shop seems like the kind of place you could spend hours browsing in, wondering and inquiring about the provenance of the pieces Joanne stocks.

Issue No. 15 features images from Joanne’s home, taken by Seth Smoot. Often, when you have such a talented photographer capturing a beautiful interior, you end up with more pictures than you can fit on the print pages. So of course we had to share some of those additional, unpublished shots here on the blog. (Um, how great is her shoe collection?!)

Anthology-Rossman-bedAnthology-Rossman-shoe-collection Anthology-Rossman-umbrellas-glass-flowerAnthology-Rossman-cabinetAnd here’s a photo of her storefront, which will probably make you want to head to Roslindale right now. (Luckily, Joanne also has an online shop.)

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{ All photos by Seth Smoot for Anthology Magazine }

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Anthology-Tracy-Wilkinson-portraitI am so glad that photographer Laure Joliet suggested that we feature Tracy Wilkinson in Issue No. 15/Spring 2014 (our current release). Tracy is one super talented lady, and I pretty much love everything that she does: her pottery, her woven lighting, her apparel. When I interviewed her, I couldn’t help but be impressed—and inspired—by all of her creative pursuits. (She also happens to be the designer behind one of my favorite, but sadly now defunct, brands: Mon Petit Oiseau.)

You can read more about Tracy in Issue No. 15, but I wanted to share some of Laure’s outtakes from her afternoon with Tracy, so you can get a glimpse of her home and creative process. And don’t forget to check out the TW Workshop online store!

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{ Photos by Laure Joliet for Anthology Magazine }

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Le Marche St. George in Vancouver

Last November, I went to Vancouver to attend the shoot for Janaki Larsen, her husband Pascal Roy, and sister Klee Larsen—they are featured in the Spring 2014 issue in a story titled “All in the Family.”

I admit I didn’t know much about them or Le Marché St. George, the café they own, aside from what photographer Claudette Carracedo described. She told me repeatedly that I was going to love the café as well as the down-to-earth family that owns it. And she wasn’t the only one singing its praises: the day before the shoot, during a visit to The Cross, the employees there also underscored how lovely and European the café is.

Le Marche St. George in Vancouver

The café is located on an unassuming street corner in Riley Park, a sleepy, tree-lined residential neighborhood. Janaki, Pascal, and Klee live in the apartments adjacent to it. After spending time in their homes, I got to check out Le Marché later in the day. (However, I did get a taste of the café literally as Pascal delivered a cappuccino to me in the apartment. One word: gratifying.) My first impression? They had crafted a place that feels like a close-kept secret and features the couple’s pared-down, effortless style. (As it happens, that style has a pedigree as you’ll see in the article.) It gave the appearance that it wasn’t born in meticulous design planning and to-do lists, but rather guided by a wabi-sabi approach with happy accidents dictating the decisions.

Le Marche St. George in Vancouver

Le Marche St. George in Vancouver

Simply put: it’s a perfect spot for a warm drink and a book on a rainy day or a charming nook to sit with a companion over lattes and croissants. But don’t let the café’s European aesthetic or artisanal fare fool you. While it’s easy to let this café fall into hipster zeitgeist, it’s more than that. It’s not necessarily a venue “to see and be seen” nor merely the next photo location for someone’s Instagram feed. There’s an honesty to this place that harkens back to the days when neighborhoods had a local hangout and corner store. I watched as locals picked up vegetables and get their coffee fix. They greeted each other while their pets or children did the same. Le Marché has only been around a little over two years, but it practically feels like a neighborhood institution.

So Claudette was right: I would love this place and the people behind it. I just wish I could’ve taken it whole and brought it back with me.

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{ Photographs by Claudette Carracedo }

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