Design

Liz Robb at West Coast Craft

by Nancy on June 23, 2015

AnthologyMag-Blog-LizRobb1Seeing a weaver work is like watching a musician perform with a tactile outcome: The repetitive movements become rhythmic and the weaver creates a piece with patterns, motifs, and color. The imagery above caught my eye immediately when I walked the West Coast Craft show a couple Sundays ago, and was pleased to find a mini-exhibit of Liz Robb’s work.

Robb started her career as a fashion designer in NYC, but then switched gears and after obtaining her master’s degree in fibers. She wasn’t in her booth when I walked in, and I was so drawn and tempted to touch her artwork. I had to refrain myself and instead, I peered closely at the details of her work; the indigo, copper, paint, and what looked to be hundreds of wood beads. I love that her pieces have dimension, and are subtle with beautiful textures. I can’t wait to see more of her work in the future.

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DSC06349{ All images by Lisa Wong Jackson }

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Susanna Vento

by Kate on June 17, 2015

anthologymag-blog-styling-susannavento-1In many ways, interior styling is a delightful form of grown-up play. When I’m working on a concept for a photo shoot, I’m reminded of all the times I meticulously arranged and re-arranged the furniture in my dollhouse when I was younger, or stacked colored wooden blocks in abstract formations. What I love about styling is the way it approaches objects: as elements of a larger narrative and as abstract forms with color, shape, and texture.

I discovered Helsinki- based stylist Susanna Vento through her work for Deko magazine, and instantly wanted to see more. Her styling is simple and sparse, but nevertheless my eyes have plenty to dance around and devour in these images. The products shine in her work, not only as part of the atmosphere she creates, but as interesting shapes in an artful composition. I highly recommend checking out her other styling work for inspiration—and visual delight.

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anthologymag-blog-styling-susannavento-5{ All images via Susanna Vento }

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Diggi Dot by Skinny laMinx

by Nancy on June 10, 2015

Anthology Mag BlogSkinny laMinx - Diggi Dot03Every summer, things slow down a little at our house and I have time to work on a simple sewing project. Whenever I’m looking for fun, bright, bold, and colorful patterned fabrics, Skinny laMinx is my first stop. And on my latest virtual visit, I was excited to see that they just launched a new fabric collection called Diggit Dot.

Heather Moore, creator of Skinny laMinx, designs patterns through drawing and paper cutting. She transfers her designs onto paper and fabric goods; she has also has a wallpaper line at Robin Sprong. The Diggi Dot range was inspired by block printing and her trip to Jaipur, India. Many of the patterns and shapes are drawn with delicate and organic lines. I appreciate how this creates a lighter and less saturated feeling, while still highlighting fresh and bright colors—perfect for my summertime pillow project!

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 { All images by Skinny laMinx }

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Stuffed Hipster Emblems

by Nancy on June 4, 2015

Anthology-magazine-blog-MimiOChun1I can’t remember how I found Mimi O Chun’s website, but I immediately saved her link in my special bookmarks folder after being on her site for almost an hour. Mimi received her MFA in Graphic Design at Yale University, and has worked as the design director at General Assembly. She is currently working on “Stuffed Hipster Emblems“—plush replicas of  iconic goods built around craft. (The above grouping references Saturday mornings at the popular San Francisco spot The Mill.)

As I clicked through each soft sculptured good, I was amazed by all of the detailed stitching and texture. Every photo left me wanting to know more about her process.

Anthology-magazine-blog-MimiOChun2Anthology-magazine-blog-MimiOChun5Anthology-magazine-blog-MimiOChun6Anthology-magazine-blog-MimiOChun4{ All images by Mimi O Chun }

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Ash and Anchor

by Joanna on May 19, 2015

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Craving some pattern? Ash and Anchor is the place for you. From scarves to trays to pillows, these patterned pieces are a bit bohemian, a bit eclectic, and a gorgeous layer to add to any home. The artwork is created in the New York City studio of Nina Pace, and has been since 2011 when she made a departure from her traditional fine arts background. Pace then refocused her work on the highly detailed backgrounds of her paintings, making those the focal point instead. Her highly detailed, bold artwork now adorns many gorgeous pieces, but I’ve got my eyes on the textiles line.

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{ Images via Ash and Anchor }

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