Artwork

Today I’m excited to share the second installment of Claudette Carracedo‘s The Mother-Daughter Project, which we’re featuring in the weeks leading up to Mother’s Day. If you missed the first installment last week, you can find it here. When Claudette started photographing these pairs, “the goal was to create an authentic image that speaks to the uniqueness of each mother-daughter relationship.” While she captured the women on film, she also listened to them describe their relationships to one another and recorded some of the most emotive words.

From Claudette: When Kelly and Maisie came into the studio I was a taken aback by how closely Maisie resembled her mom in high school. I hadn’t seen Kelly in over 20 years. I knew Kelly’s youngest daughter, Indie, struggle with breathing as she was born with paralyzed vocal chords and has had a tracheostomy for 12 years. During the session it was clear to me Maisie has been an incredible source of strength for Kelly throughout the years.

From Claudette: Bianca, my sister-in-law, and Elizabeth are family. They connect on a daily basis over the phone, however, the project appeared to have given them a reason to connect on an even deeper level, which was an honor to witness. I felt we all walked away with a few ‘aha’ moments that day.

The subjects in Claudette’s photos include mothers and daughters who are current clients and collaborators; friends and family (among them, her own mother); and even classmates she hasn’t seen in over 20 years. I hope you’ll check back every Thursday between now and Mother’s Day for new installments highlighting The Mother-Daughter Project.

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Captivating and astounding, right? These photographs are by New York-based Bing Wright, and feature reflections of sunsets in shattered mirrors. The series, called Broken Mirror/Evening Sky, was exhibited in the Paula Cooper Gallery. Each piece measures 4-by-six feet, making them incredibly striking. Imagine how completely different the viewing experience is at that large scale, versus on a computer screen. I’d love a chance to see these in person.

{ Images via Bing Wright }

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Mother’s Day is exceptionally special for me this year, with a 14-month-old daughter at home. Being a mom myself casts a new light on the holiday, not just with respect to my own daughter, but also to my mother. What was about breakfast in bed and homemade cards when I was a kid now has added depth and sentiment. So I’ve been really looking forward to this new series that’s launching on our site today: Over the next several weeks, leading up to Mother’s Day, we’ll be sharing images from photographer Claudette Carracedo’s The Mother-Daughter Project.

“As photographers, our style and vision create the look and feel of a portrait,” explains Claudette. “The Mother-Daughter Project was a way of exploring how much of our personal history and biases affect a session. The idea was to provide a unified look using a single lighting system and backdrop, as well as a allow the participants to describe their relationship to each other as I photographed them. Ultimately, the goal was to create an authentic image that speaks to the uniqueness of each mother-daughter relationship.”

From Claudette: Two years ago Gaile’s mother, Ebie, was diagnosed with Early Onset Alzheimer’s at the age of 58. Last year Gaile, a talented designer, and her team built a Laneway home for IDSWest. The Laneway home was auctioned off with all proceeds going to the Alzheimer’s Society of BC.

From Claudette: I had the pleasure of photographing Adria’s wedding in 2010 and meeting her first child, Ayla, has been such a delight.

The subjects in Claudette’s photos include mothers and daughters who are current clients and collaborators; friends and family (among them, her own mother); and even classmates she hasn’t seen in over 20 years. I hope you’ll check back every Thursday between now and Mother’s Day for new installments highlighting The Mother-Daughter Project.

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Ashley Le Quere

by Alexis on April 9, 2014

I first spotted the work of Melbourne-based illustrator and surface designer Ashley Le Quere on a wall—several of her patterns have been translated to wallpapers—and wanted to find out more about her. Well, I found plenty more to love in her portfolio. Ashley studied illustration at the University of the West of England and graduated in 2009. While she does work as an illustrator, her real passion is for surface design. Ashley combines traditional media—like watercolor and pen and ink—with digital creations. I especially love the way the scale of her motifs translate. The detail and texture is just as beautiful in smaller scale prints as a floor-to-ceiling application. Many of Ashley’s works are available in her Society6 shop.

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Cut Paper by Zim & Zou

by Joanna on April 1, 2014

Zim & Zou is a French design studio started by Lucie Thomas and Thibault Zimmermann. Together, they explore many media, such as graphic design, illustration, paper sculpture, and installation-based art. For example, they started their Paper Rebirth projects as a means to educate and show the benefits of recycling. They encouraged passersby to leave used paper in the installation, then used the papers to create sculptures. Using the metaphor of a phoenix, Zim & Zou showed audiences that “paper can have up to 5 lives thanks to recycling.”

{ Images via Zim & Zou }

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