Artists at Work

Mother’s Day is exceptionally special for me this year, with a 14-month-old daughter at home. Being a mom myself casts a new light on the holiday, not just with respect to my own daughter, but also to my mother. What was about breakfast in bed and homemade cards when I was a kid now has added depth and sentiment. So I’ve been really looking forward to this new series that’s launching on our site today: Over the next several weeks, leading up to Mother’s Day, we’ll be sharing images from photographer Claudette Carracedo’s The Mother-Daughter Project.

“As photographers, our style and vision create the look and feel of a portrait,” explains Claudette. “The Mother-Daughter Project was a way of exploring how much of our personal history and biases affect a session. The idea was to provide a unified look using a single lighting system and backdrop, as well as a allow the participants to describe their relationship to each other as I photographed them. Ultimately, the goal was to create an authentic image that speaks to the uniqueness of each mother-daughter relationship.”

From Claudette: Two years ago Gaile’s mother, Ebie, was diagnosed with Early Onset Alzheimer’s at the age of 58. Last year Gaile, a talented designer, and her team built a Laneway home for IDSWest. The Laneway home was auctioned off with all proceeds going to the Alzheimer’s Society of BC.

From Claudette: I had the pleasure of photographing Adria’s wedding in 2010 and meeting her first child, Ayla, has been such a delight.

The subjects in Claudette’s photos include mothers and daughters who are current clients and collaborators; friends and family (among them, her own mother); and even classmates she hasn’t seen in over 20 years. I hope you’ll check back every Thursday between now and Mother’s Day for new installments highlighting The Mother-Daughter Project.

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Sabatina Leccia Studio

by Alexis on April 16, 2014

I came across the work of Sabatina Leccia and was completely mesmerized. The combination of embroidery, staining, painting, and drawing results in compositions that feel spontaneous and organic. But the level of detail and work involved in all those hand-placed stitches and beads suggests anything but. I reached out to Sabatina to find out more about her process. Her words reflect the organic quality of her pieces: “I am not drawing what I’m going to do before the making in order to be completely free…” Sabatina uses her embroidery—which she views more as painting than a traditional decorative art—as an opportunity to meditate and reflect.

{ Images provided by Sabatina Leccia }

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Ashley Le Quere

by Alexis on April 9, 2014

I first spotted the work of Melbourne-based illustrator and surface designer Ashley Le Quere on a wall—several of her patterns have been translated to wallpapers—and wanted to find out more about her. Well, I found plenty more to love in her portfolio. Ashley studied illustration at the University of the West of England and graduated in 2009. While she does work as an illustrator, her real passion is for surface design. Ashley combines traditional media—like watercolor and pen and ink—with digital creations. I especially love the way the scale of her motifs translate. The detail and texture is just as beautiful in smaller scale prints as a floor-to-ceiling application. Many of Ashley’s works are available in her Society6 shop.

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Debbie Carlos’ Honig

by Alexis on March 28, 2014

We’re big fans of Debbie Carlos’ work—are you familiar with her oversized prints?—so it was a pleasant surprise to find another source of inspiration from Debbie: her food-focused Tumblr Honig. When I’m feeling stuck in a menu-planning rut, I love to search through beautiful images of food. It never fails to send me off into new territory and I end up with a few new dishes in my repertoire. Most of Debbie’s Tumblr images have links to recipes, including some that have already made their way onto my favorites list, like this bread. So if you’re searching for something delicious to whip up in the kitchen this weekend, take a look at Honig.

{ Images from Honig by Debbie Carlos }

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Sipho Mabona

by Alexis on March 19, 2014

Sipho Mabona is the paper artist behind this incredible origami elephant—and what you can’t tell from the first image is that it’s life-sized! The endeavor required a 50-foot square of paper and a team of artists to create. You can get a glimpse at the building process on Sipho’s Tumblr. I love the soft, crumpled look of the paper; the effect is almost like elephant skin.

To approach the monumental piece of art, Sipho put together a crowdfunding campaign. I’m always amazed by the incredible projects made possible by crowdfunding. Brilliant artists and makers are able to actualize ideas that would have likely stayed in sketchbooks without it. As one of the rewards for supporting the campaign, Sipho created plaster casts of the unfolded paper pattern of the elephant. The hard-lined geometric pattern next to the finished product is such an interesting juxtaposition.

{ Images via Sipho Mabona }

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