Apple Flognarde

by Alexis on March 7, 2014

After the literal multi-layered feat that was last month’s recipe, I thought, “What simple dish provides me great joy without making myself crazy in preparing it?” A long-time fan of custards both sweet and savory, this dish from a favorite “foods of France” book is one I return to regularly. This custard, called a flognarde—because of its origins in Auvergne and the type of fruit incorporated—is similar to the better-known clafoutis and is every bit as delicious.

Think rustic French paysage and the simple, perfect foods that represent it. It is a particularly unfussy recipe. With the most basic of ingredients, you have a presentation-worthy dessert. Or breakfast, if you’re feeling decadent. Et voilà!

Apple Flognarde
Serves 4

  • 4 free-range eggs
  • 5 tbsp flour
  • 4 tbsp sugar
  • 2/3 cup milk, use grass-fed whole milk if possible
  • zest from 2-3 meyer lemons
  • 3 apples, peeled and cut into wedges
  • 4 tbsp butter, cubed, plus more to grease the pan
  • confectioners sugar, for dusting

Note: You may substitute sliced pears for the apples, or include a scatter of raisins or grapes if you want to experiment with variations on the flognarde.

  1. Grease a medium enameled cast iron skillet. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. Mix together the flour, sugar, zest, and milk. Add the eggs and beat vigorously. Continue beating while pouring mixture into the pan.
  3. Fan the apple wedges and lay out in a pleasing fashion. It’s okay if they slide around a little as you place them.
  4. Dot with butter and bake until the custard rises and has turned golden brown at the edges, about 30 minutes. Dust with confectioners sugar and serve hot or cold.

{Photos by Melina Hammer}

Leave a Comment

*

Previous post:

Next post: